neurological health


Stroke in women 2012 PDF Print E-mail

Stroke. 2012 Apr;43(4):939-45. Epub 2012 Mar 8.

Alcohol consumption and risk of stroke in women.

Jimenez M, Chiuve SE, Glynn RJ, Stampfer MJ, Camargo CA Jr, Willett WC, Manson JE, Rexrode KM.

Source

Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption has been consistently associated with lower risk of heart disease, but data for stroke are less certain. A lower risk of stroke with light-to-moderate alcohol intake has been suggested, but the dose response among women remains uncertain and the data in this subgroup have been sparse.

METHODS:

A total of 83 578 female participants of the Nurses' Health Study who were free of diagnosed cardiovascular disease and cancer at baseline were followed-up from 1980 to 2006. Data on self-reported alcohol consumption were assessed at baseline and updated approximately every 4 years, whereas stroke and potential confounder data were updated at baseline and biennially. Strokes were classified according to the National Survey of Stroke criteria.

RESULTS:

We observed 2171 incident strokes over 1 695 324 person-years. In multivariable adjusted analyses, compared to abstainers, the relative risks of stroke were 0.83 (95% CI, 0.75-0.92) for <5 g/d, 0.79 (95% CI, 0.70-0.90) for 5 to 14.9 g/d, 0.87 (0.72-1.05) for 15 to 29.9 g/d, and 1.06 (95% CI, 0.86-1.30) for 30 to 45 g/d. Results were similar for ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.

CONCLUSIONS:

Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of total stroke. In this population of women with modest alcohol consumption, an elevated risk of total stroke related to alcohol was not observed.

 

 
Suicide Rates and Spirit Consumption in Russia PDF Print E-mail

Psychiatr Danub. 2011 Dec;23(4):378-83.
The effects of beverage type on suicide rate in Russia.
Razvodovsky YE.
Source
Grodno State Medical University, 230009, Grodno, str. Gorky 80, Belarus. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Research evidence has suggested that the consumption of different types of alcoholic beverage may have a differential effect on suicide rate. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and suicide rates in Russia.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS:
Age-standardized sex- and age-specific suicide rate for the period 1980-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sale were obtained from the Russian State Statistical Committee. Time-series analytical modeling techniques (ARIMA) were used to examine the relationship between the sale of different alcoholic beverages and suicide rates.
RESULTS:
Vodka consumption as measured by sale was significantly associated with both male and female suicide rate. The consumption of beer and wine were not associated with suicide rate. The estimates of the age specific models for men were positive (except for the 75+ age group) and ranging from 0.069 (60-74 age group) to 0.123 (30-44 age group). The estimates for women were positive for the 15-29 age group (0.08), 30-44 age group (0.096) and 45-59 age group (0.057).
CONCLUSIONS:
These findings suggest that public health efforts should focus on both reducing overall consumption and changing beverage preference away from distilled spirits in order to reduce suicide rate in Russia.

 
Wine Drinking and Essential Tremor PDF Print E-mail

Mov Disord. 2011 Apr 19. doi: 10.1002/mds.23603. [Epub ahead of print]
Wine drinking and essential tremor: A possible protective role.
Nicoletti A, Mostile G, Cappellani R, Contrafatto D, Arabia G, Lamberti P, Marconi R, Morgante L, Barone P, Quattrone A, Zappia M.
Source
Dipartimento di Neuroscienze, Università di Catania, Catania, Italy.
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the possible association of cigarette smoking, coffee drinking, and wine consumption with essential tremor using a matched case-control design. Cases and controls were enrolled from 6 Movement Disorder centers in central-southern Italy. Essential tremor was diagnosed according to Bain's criteria. Three unrelated healthy controls (not affected by neurological disorders) per each enrolled case, matched by sex and age (±5 years), were selected. A standardized questionnaire was administered to record demographic, epidemiological, and clinical data. All cases and controls underwent a standard neurological examination. Adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using conditional logistic regression for the matched cases and controls. Eighty-three patients with essential tremor (38 men and 45 women; mean age, 68.2 ± 8.6 years) and 245 matched control subjects (113 men and 132 women; mean age, 68.4 ± 9.7 years) were enrolled in the study. Multivariate analysis showed a significant negative association between essential tremor and wine consumption preceding the onset of disease (adjusted odds ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.64; P = .0005) with a significant dose effect (1-2 glass of wine per day: odds ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.10-0.95; P = .04; more than 3 glass of wine per day: odds ratio, 0.14; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.62; P = .01). In our sample no association between essential tremor and cigarette smoking or coffee drinking was found. Our data suggest a negative association between wine drinking and essential tremor, which could be explained by the long-term neuroprotective effect of its antioxidant components. © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.
Copyright © 2011 Movement Disorder Society.

 
Alcohol consumption and risk of glioblastoma; evidence from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study PDF Print E-mail


Int J Cancer. 2011 Apr 15;128(8):1929-34. doi: 10.1002/ijc.25770. Epub 2011 Jan 12.
Alcohol consumption and risk of glioblastoma; evidence from the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study.
Baglietto L, Giles GG, English DR, Karahalios A, Hopper JL, Severi G.
Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia.
Abstract
Despite the brain being highly susceptible to the action of alcohol and, therefore, potentially susceptible to its carcinogenic effects, it is not clear whether alcohol consumption is associated with risk of glioblastoma. We analyzed data from 39,766 participants of the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study recruited in 1990-1994 and followed to the end of 2008 for an average of 15 years. Incidence of glioblastoma of the brain was ascertained via linkage to the Victorian and other State cancer registries in Australia. During a structured face-to-face interview at baseline we elicited each participant's history of alcoholic beverage consumption during the current decade at baseline. We used Cox regression models with age as the time metric, adjusted for country of birth, sex, total energy intake, educational attainment and coffee consumption to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). A total of 67 glioblastomas was diagnosed in the cohort during follow-up. The HRs associated with each additional 10 grams per day of alcohol intake was 1.16 (95% CI, 1.05 to 1.29; p for linear trend = 0.007). Compared to lifetime abstainer, the HR for glioblastoma associated with alcohol consumption were 1.07 (0.55 to 2.10) for 1 to 19 g/day, 1.79 (0.81 to 3.95) for 20 to 39 g/day, 3.07 (1.26 to 7.47) for 40 to 59 g/day and 2.54 (0.92 to 7.00) for 60 or more g/day. Alcohol consumption at baseline was associated with the risk of glioblastoma in a dose-response relationship.
Copyright © 2011 UICC.
PMID: 21344375 [PubMed - in process]

 
The effects of beverage type on homicide rates in Russia, 1970-2005. PDF Print E-mail


Drug Alcohol Rev. 2011 Mar 22. doi: 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2011.00310.x. [Epub ahead of print]
The effects of beverage type on homicide rates in Russia, 1970-2005.
Stickley A, Razvodovsky Y.
Department of Global Health Policy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Stockholm Centre on Health of Societies in Transition (SCOHOST), Södertörn University, Huddinge, Sweden Grodno State Medical University, Grodno, Belarus.
Abstract
Introduction and Aims. Previous research from Western Europe and North America has suggested that consuming different types of alcoholic beverage may have differing effects on homicide rates both within and between countries. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the consumption of different beverage types and homicide rates in Russia across the later-Soviet and post-Soviet periods. Design and Methods. Age-standardised male and female homicide data for the period 1970-2005 and data on beverage-specific alcohol sales were obtained from the Russian State Statistical Committee (Rosstat). Time series analysis (autoregressive integrated moving average modelling) was used to examine the relation between the sale (consumption) of different alcoholic beverages and homicide rates. Results. Total alcohol consumption and vodka consumption as measured by sales were significantly associated with both male and female homicide rates: a 1 L increase in overall alcohol sales would result in a 5.9% increase in the male homicide rate and a 5.1% increase in the female homicide rate. The respective figures for vodka were 16.4% and 14.3%. The consumption of beer and wine was not associated with changes in homicide rates. Discussion and Conclusions. Our findings suggest that the consumption of distilled spirits has had an especially detrimental impact on lethal violence in Russia from at least 1970 onwards. In order to reduce homicide rates in this context, alcohol policy should focus on reducing overall consumption as well as attempting to shift the beverage preference away from distilled spirits.[Stickley A, Razvodovsky Y. The effects of beverage type on homicide rates in Russia, 1970-2005. Drug Alcohol Rev 2011].
© 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.
PMID: 21426423 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

 
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